STEM Interest: How Can I Help?

I have wanted to write something for quite a while but have not had the proper inspiration (or motivation). When in doubt, go with your recurring thoughts. For me, this includes interest in the STEM fields locally or globally via the internet.

 

I recently did a search for local STEM organizations that I could volunteer my time or efforts. Knoxville, however, is not really considered a STEM-Mecca. Actually, I did not find a single NPO focusing on science. This was not a huge shock, but it was a huge disappointment. I know I am not the only Ph.D.-strapped person in the area who could potentially help spread science literacy or interests.

 

In graduate school, my major professor did talks at local middle schools that we gladly went to so these students could see what an actual scientist looked like. We were an eclectic bunch just like the science community itself. We could tell the students enjoyed and appreciated our visits, and hopefully some of them will pursue a career in a STEM field. I now try to fuel interest in my own undergraduate classroom for my students. I’m not satisfied with my current reach and would love the opportunity to expand it. The best way to a future with progress and prosperity is through a logical and literate society.

 

I do my little blog with my little graphics and illustrations. What else can I do? I need to channel my passions for spreading the science in a focused and steady way. So, I need your help: help me help others.

Technology Education for Students Is Essential in Creating a Future STEM Workforce, and It Starts With Educating Teachers | Felix W. Ortiz III

This truly is a growing concern and rightly so:

Technology Education for Students Is Essential in Creating a Future STEM Workforce, and It Starts With Educating Teachers | Felix W. Ortiz III.

A Career Change is Quite Literally a Dream Changer

Those who may know me also know I can have weird or vivid dreams on a regular basis. For as long as I can remember, I have had dreams of tornadoes at least once a week. Another recurring dream subject for many years has been airplanes. Me on an airplane. You might not think anything of it, but some of these ‘airplanes’ were actually non-flying objects like a passenger van or a pharmacy in the basement of a local hospital I used to work. One of these dreams I clearly remember because I was flying the plane from a second cockpit in the plane’s ‘attic’ and had to continuously put oil on a gear to keep the plane in the air.

Over the past year, these airplane dreams have expanded to airports. Me in an airport. You might not think anything of it, but some of these airports were very small; the size of a restaurant (with bar). A year ago, I lost what I considered the perfect job promoting and writing about science emerging from one of the Departments of the U.S. The airport dreams started around the same time I was laid off.

I recently had a dramatic change in my recurring dreams. I no longer am at an airport or on a plane between airports. Suddenly, my method of transportation was not by air, but by sea; ships, cruise ships to be exact. Sometimes these ships were floating hotels with thousands of people watching high school basketball or attending a conference. Sometimes my family was on board and other times I knew no one aboard the boat.

I recently had a career change from science writer to science instructor at a local college teaching the wonderful subject of Biology. This is something I am very fond of and no stranger to with my Ph.D. in biochemistry, cellular and molecular biology. My passion for promoting science to the masses had to be honed to promoting science to the classes.

What does this have to do with dreams?

Dream interpreting is not one of my hobbies, but this one is quite easy for me to discern. Airplanes are a way to travel great distances in a short amount of time. One can cross the globe and be back home in a day or so. Imagine the sheer amount of contact a person can have with people on that journey. The airports were just a mode of transition. The dreams were no longer about flying but instead about what happened after landing. It was time to slow down.

What about the cruise ships? Ships don’t travel at break-neck speed, but they can get a person across the ocean or gulf and back within a week or so.This leaves ample time to explore the ship and get to know the people aboard; learn their stories and backgrounds. It gives time to tailor your message to those whom you see daily for a period of time until the next cruise when you start over with a new group of passengers.

 

There you go; a career change from science writer to science instructor. Or, as my brain sees it, jet setter to cruise ship director perhaps.

 

Now, if I only knew what the heck all the tornado dreams were about…

Graduate School Does Not Prepare Students to Teach Effectively

Graduate School is Great

Don’t get me wrong. I enjoyed most of my experience while in graduate school working towards my Ph.D. I was paid to fuel my personal curiosities about how bacteria make choices. It was a win-win in my opinion. I was contributing to the overall knowledge of the scientific community and making connections that I never would have dreamed of years before. I could safely say no one on the planet was investigating the same phenomena I was, so I held knowledge only I knew. Pretty amazing feeling. I read some article in Science Careers long ago about advice for graduate students. One nugget was that the student needed to become the expert of their project, not their advisor. I tried to make that my goal and knew I was succeeding when my advisor would ask my advice about observations she was making in the lab.

Graduate School is Good

Don’t get me wrong. Graduate school was not all a field of lilies. It was hard, very hard. Blazing trails and keeping up with all the latest research from around the world about my topic was daunting. Then, there was the preliminary exam (aka qualifying exam); six weeks of taking on an entirely different topic, becoming an expert, devising experiments to answer research questions, writing a full grant proposal, presenting to the department, and defending your ideas for hours is not for the faint of heart. However, the prelim (I had to go through twice) is like being thrown into the ocean as an infant and told to swim the English Channel. If you make it, you are a much better scientist for it. It was HARD, but I don’t regret all the effort it took.

Graduate School is O.K.

Working in the lab can be very time consuming. Many lab bosses expect the grad students to be in the lab 60 to 80 hours a week. I should have been in the lab more, I admit, but I also had a wife and a daughter the last couple years. I had a lot of expectations of me not only as a student and a training scientist but also as a husband and father. Only one of these four expectations was I an expert at after 25 years of schooling. Being spread so thin made each facet that much harder. Needless to say, my wife (and daughter, and in-laws, and parents, and brother, and the rest of the family, and friends, etc.) were very excited when I finally saw the fruits of my indentured labor.

Graduate School is Absolutely Horrible

Don’t get me wrong. I had opportunities to ‘teach’ students during graduate school. I taught a few semesters of lower-level biology lab sections early on. I enjoyed trying to make connections for the students. I remembered when it all came together for me and the light clicked. I wanted that so badly for my students; and much earlier in their academic career.

Now I am out of school with a degree I am very proud of. At what point in graduate school was I supposed to become an expert teacher? Much emphasis is towards shaping an independent scientist who can survive in the jungle, and rightly so. But, what about an emphasis on one of the tenets that come with many job descriptions those fledgling scientists would eventually end up with: instructing? No courses, no seminars. Am I missing something? Is the arena of instructing young minds preparing them for the future jobs we need them to take and excel at not important?

I am very fortunate. I have a faculty position now. I am an expert…but not at what I am expected to do, teach. I am a novice, an infant trying to very quickly consume as much information in teaching strategies and instructing styles that I feel I should have been exposed to in school. Do the science departments and education departments of our colleges and universities know of each other’s existence and absolute need for integration?

I want to be the best instructor ever. I want my students to get it every lecture/class meeting. I want them to appreciate the world around them and make logical decisions. Is that too much to ask? It is for the current state of a majority of graduate schools.

 

Using HIV to Cure Leukemia: Mixed Emotions About the Claims

For those who don’t know, I teach a health science research course at a local college. I love teaching this class because I am allowed to give students a foundation in scientific inquiry and build upon this up to current topics in health science like personalized medicine and systems approaches. All this builds up to an article summary the students prepare based upon a journal article of their choosing.

Two of the students pairing up to present a summary of their paper showed me last night a video they found that accompanied the research they were excited about presenting [see below].

First, I was surprised the principal investigator, Carl June, when asked if he was curing cancer, said unequivocally, “Yes”. I understand this is a promotional video produced by GE, but June really took the bait.

I truly recognize the enormous potential this type of therapy has. The week before being shown this video by the students, I gave a short lecture about science and the media. The main point was to be skeptical of the message portrayed by the media. It appears, I need to revisit this subject.

This promotion of research goes beyond the “Hidden DNA Code” press release that went viral as part of the ENCODE project from the University of Washington. Not only was the wording sketchy (using ‘HIV’ to cure leukemia), but the lead researchers are touting curing cancer (leukemia in this case). A very good article about this entire subject can be found here. In small clinical trials, the therapy has found success thankfully. However, the trials have been very small thus far and we are dealing with cancer; the correct term is remission, not cure.

I urge everyone, please do not read medical breakthrough stories and go away with a warm fuzzy feeling. Please take an extra step and dig a bit deeper. You will find the warm fuzzy feeling is not for the present story you just read but from the optimism you (and everyone else for that matter) should feel about the stories to come in the future when the science has been thoroughly tested and the therapy is real.

For ‘Emma’ in the above video and only Emma, today that therapy is real.

Mother Nature’s Chuckle: The Language of the Universe is not English

Miraculous opportunity for self-reflection.

 

There it is. Our home. To us it seems like such a huge place where we will never meet all our neighbors. A place where we live our daily lives consumed with news and opinions from all directions. We work. We play. We do silly stuff like fight wars or think we are the best at this sport or that.

Now look at the picture. Could you spot ‘us’ without the circle? As the dominant species on our planet, we think we are on top. We can explore our Moon. We can travel to our neighbor planet with robots. It is said the human brain is the most complex piece of matter in the known universe.

All Mother Nature can do is chuckle.

As the above image easily shows, it is all about perspective. Our grandeur is self-inflated. Despite the best efforts and actions of us on Earth, Mother Nature will always have the upper hand. She gives us room to explore. She allows us to make strides, great and small. But inevitably, she always reminds us we can not walk confidently on our journey. Stellar threats are all around; invisible until the time of their death in our black or blue sky. Prehistoric mass extinctions to modern day injuries and destruction in Russia last year.

Mother Nature does not speak any of our earthly language. She only speaks the language of the universe. The language we wish to learn through our research and study. The language we long to understand for it will tell us our true history…from the beginning.

On this International Women’s Day, remember, we are all very important to ourselves. However, our great Mother still laughs at us.

 

 

 

How to Submit to Abstract 2.0

I’m very glad to finally initiate Abstract 2.0. I hope this resource will be of great help to anyone willing to utilize it.

For now, I have set up a separate website for the submission and archiving of abstracts by those who contribute. The website is  http://abstracts.sciofrelief.com.

Here is an example of a re-written abstract:

Colleen T. O’Loughlin, Laura C. Miller, Albert Siryaporn, Knut Drescher, Martin F. Semmelhack, and Bonnie L. Bassler (2013) 110:17981–17986, doi:10.1073/pnas.1316981110

 A quorum-sensing inhibitor blocks Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence and biofilm formation

 Quorum sensing is a way a bacterium communicates to the cells around it to regulate behavior of the community as a whole. This process occurs in harmless bacteria as well as pathogens. One such pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, uses quorum sensing to attack its host in a concerted effort by all the cells present and to control how the cells ‘stick’ together once infecting the host. In an effort to prevent P. aeruginosa attack and infection, researchers tested synthetic molecules to identify those which block cells from receiving the attack message. One such molecule, meta-bromo-thiolactone (mBTL), succeeded in blocking the message and protected a roundworm model system and human lung cells from dying due to infection. The paper also discusses how mBTL works at the molecular level. The results from this study could help control complications in cystic fibrosis and hospital infections due to contaminated equipment.