The perpetual chasm between society and congress

The men and women we call leaders.

 

Thank you, Congress, for your objective and far-sighted vision showing the nation is your top priority and you are looking out for its best interest. The most recent survey data from the National Science Foundation shows the general public overwhelmingly supports federal funding of basic research:

Since 1985, NSF surveys have asked Americans whether, “even if it brings no immediate benefits, scientific research that advances the frontiers of knowledge is necessary and should be supported by the federal government.” In 2010, 82% agreed or strongly agreed with this statement; 14% disagreed. 

Not only does the public support federal funding for science and engineering research, they also hold high esteem for scientists, second only to firefighters and ahead of doctors, teachers, and members of the clergy. In another section, 91% of surveyed Americans are at least moderately interested in scientific discoveries. So, there is hope Americans can become more science literate.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Sequestration takes toll on research, education (universityofcalifornia.edu)

Never send for whom the budget tolls, it tolls for thee: an open letter Part III.

During the current political environment, R&D budgets are being reduced or frozen. For example, the budget for NIH, the largest public funding program in the U.S., is lower than it was in 2003. The “Plan B” outlined in the Budget Control Act of 2011 (aka sequester) plus the current 6-month continuing resolution cycle employed by Congress has all in the research community scared; not only for their own jobs but also for what it is saying to our citizens and people across the globe.  Our ‘leaders’ in Washington no longer consider basic research a priority. In essence, the ‘leaders’ are saying, “We are too worried about our re-election bids to see the big picture and the catastrophic consequences of our short-sightedness”.

The innovations and technologies directly or indirectly resulting from basic research have brought invaluable prosperity to this country and has enriched the lives of each of us directly. Cuts to research are the essentially the same as cuts to flesh. Eventually, the infection at the cut spreads to the entire body. The cut doesn’t suffer, the body suffers. John Donne said it well in his passage, Meditation 17 Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions:

No man is an island,  entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main; if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friend’s or of thine own were;  any man’s death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.

The bell is tolling in the U.S. and has for some time now. We all suffer when ignoring our research community.

 

Sincerely,

Matt Russell, Ph.D.