The Microbiome: Can We Please Consider the Human Body an Ecosystem Now?

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It has long been thought the type and amount of microbes using the human body as a home shape the way we live and behave. The microbiome as it is known is shown to have a greater and greater impact in our daily lives.

A new study published in Nature (paywall) provides evidence demonstrating the artificial sweeteners we all love and consume to control weight leads to increased blood glucose levels. How can something used to replace sugar in consumables raise the amount of sugar in the blood?

Like many other answers regarding human health, look no further than the microbiome. Consuming artificial sweeteners alters the composition of the intestinal microbes leading to a growing glucose intolerance. The researchers linked artificial sweetener use to altering metabolic pathways within the microbiome that leads to increased susceptibility to metabolic disease.

To verify their findings, researchers gave antibiotics to the mice used as models thus reversing the effects of artificial sweeteners. Results were also verified by using fecal transplantation in the mice to reverse glucose intolerance.

The Human Microbiome: Our Ecosystem

We already knew the microbes outnumbered our human cells 10 to 1 and that the microgenome outnumbered our human genome 100 to 1. The evidence is growing suggesting our normal flora govern more of our lives than we naively assumed for decades. We are not individuals but individual incubators for the microbial overlords that we could not live without. Just like other ecosystems, changing our lifestyles have a complicated effect on system as a whole. Small alterations to the microbiome can have major impacts and be the difference between health and disease.

Future posts will hopefully provide evidence demonstrating how we are shaped into individual ecosystems. Thank you, microbiome.